Deep Cuts

The (Kind Of) Complete Woodstock : Introduction

Forty-three years ago today Jimi Hendrix and his Band Of Gypsys closed out the most famous music festival in music history.  There have been bigger, much better organized, more profitable festivals, but no concert gathering has ever captured people’s  imaginations the way that Woodstock has.

Arguably the reason that Michael Lang’s and Artie Kornfeld’s brainchild endures almost half a century later is that the two young producers possessed the foresight to document the event.  Engineer Eddie Kramer  spent three days in a mobile sound studio behind the stage recording the show, and filmmakers Michael Wadleigh and D.A. Pennebaker  roamed Yasgur’s farm, cameras rolling.

Wadleigh’s documentary went on to win a 1970 Academy Award, and the related soundtrack on Cotillion Records sold oh, let’s eyeball it at 957.4 billion copies.    These two documents codified for most of us the Woodstock experience:  twenty songs, some stage announcements from Chip Monck and John Morris,  and the crowd chanting “No rain!  No rain!”

Twenty songs over three days would be the most boring concert event ever.  Obviously there’s more — 297 more, to be exact — bringing the total number of songs performed at the event to 317.  Many of these missing 297 have been released over the last four decades on various official releases, bootlegs, and DVDs.   A few more have been leaked onto Youtube.

There are easier ways to do this, but I’m an honest guy so I set out to put together the most complete legal Woodstock soundtrack possible, and by “legal” I mean “no illegal downloads.”  You can recreate what I’ve done with much less money and effort, but: A) you’ll have shittier sound quality; B) you won’t feel very good about yourself; and C) collecting is fun.

So over the next several weeks I’m going to share with you how to put together a playlist of the thirty-two Woodstock performers and as many of their 317 songs as I’m aware of.   I’m even going to point out when to find a cut on the intergooglewebtubes when no other option is available.   When we’re done your Woodstock soundtrack will include over two hundred songs.

Let’s kick things off with Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock,” though she didn’t appear at the festival because her manager thought it was more important to appear on The Dick Cavett Show.  Smooth.

P.S. Warner Music Group, do you see what I go through for you?  Why don’t you throw us all a bone and put out a comprehensive box set?  It’s been forty-three frigging years already.

Next week:  Richie Havens

41 replies »

  1. I’ve only been to a few festivals in my time, Monsters of Rock, V-Fest etc but sadly I was a) too young, b) too far away and c) too musically unaware to have gone to Woodstock. Luckily for me I’m a strong believer in reincarnation and optimism so I’m quite happy to hold onto the idea that in a future life time travel will be available and I’ll finally get to see Jimi and the gang. Can’t wait! :)
    Interestingly enough, out of curiosity I just googled the lineup and just found this site: http://www.digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/music0_woodstock.html which not only lists the bands involved, but also the order they played in and their set lists…but it only adds up to 280 songs though.
    But thanks for this post. I shall follow it with interest. :)

    • There are lists out there with as few as 230, which would be great for me as I’ve managed to compile 212. Unfortunately I think we have to go with 317 songs until proven otherwise, just to be on the safe side. One other note: Day One on that list is very out of order :)

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